Flour Substitutions

Here’s a list of some flours and their protein contents, from the book Cookwise by Shirley O. Corriher:

Cake flours (Swans Down, Softasilk):
7.5 to 8.5% protein

Bleached southern all-purpose (White Lily, Martha White, Gladiola, Red Band):
7.5 to 9.5% protein

National brand self-rising (Gold Medal, Pillsbury):
9 to 10% protein

National brand bleached all-purpose (Gold Medal, Pillsbury):
10 to 12% protein

Northern all-purpose (Robin Hood, Hecker’s):
11 to 12% protein

Northern unbleached all-purpose (King Arthur):
11.7% protein

Bread Flour:
11.5 to 12.5% protein


KAF homemade self-rising flour

Self-rising flour is flour with baking powder and salt already added. A staple in many Southern recipes, it’s traditionally milled from softer, lower protein wheat, which is what grows in the South; and it produces softer, more tender baked goods than all-purpose or higher-protein flours.

Homemade self-rising flour can be used in any recipe that calls for self-rising flour. To replicate soft, Southern-style self-rising flour, start with our Perfect Pastry Blend (10.3% protein) or Unbleached Pastry Flour (8.0% protein), instead of all-purpose; and add baking powder and salt as directed in the recipe below.

If you use King Arthur All-Purpose Flour (11.7% protein) to make homemade self-rising flour, be prepared to increase the liquid a bit in any recipes you use it in (to account for this flour’s higher protein level); and expect the results to be a bit less tender.

whisk the following together thoroughly:

1 cup King Arthur flour (see options above)
1 ½ teaspoons baking powder
¼ teaspoon salt

Note: If you weigh your ingredients, Unbleached Pastry Flour weighs 3 3/4 ounces per cup; Perfect Pastry Blend, 4 ¼ ounces.

Use as directed in your recipe.

to make a larger amount of self-rising flour:
8 cups King Arthur flour (see options above)
4 tablespoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt

Whisk together thoroughly. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.


About White Lily Flour:

White Lily is a soft wheat flour that is ideal for pastry like biscuits, cookies & pie crust because of its low protein/gluten content. Because of this it is not a good choice for pizza crust or other bread doughs where you need higher gluten to give the dough structure & texture. Use all purpose or bread flour for pizza dough & you will be much happier!


Baking with Coconut Flour

Tips:

1) Use 1:1 ratio of coconut flour to liquid. Coconut flour is very absorbent.

2) Do NOT replace ALL the flour in a recipe with coconut flour – replace only one fourth the amount of flour in a recipe with an equal amount of coconut flour. Eg: If a recipe calls for 1 c all purpose flour, you can instead use: 3/4 c all purpose flour + 1/4 c coconut flour + 1/4 c ADDITIONAL LIQUID.

Verdict:

This stuff is EXPENSIVE. Because of that, there are NO good recipes available for it. Except for dieters and people too ill to eat flour (people with celiac’s disease and allergies). Because they’re the best source for dessert recipes.